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Spring 2014 Courses

Spring 2014 HRI Minor electives

H = Humanities elective

S = Social Sciences elective

H/S = Humanities or Social Sciences elective

 

 

American Studies 139AC / History C139C

Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History

TuTh 930-11am

4 units

BRILLIANT, M

H/S

 

Beginning with the onset of World War II, America experienced not a singular, unitary Civil Rights Movement -- as is typically portrayed in standard textbook accounts and the collective memory -- but rather a variety of contemporaneous civil rights and their related social movements. This course explores the history, presenting a top-down (political and legal history), bottom-up (social and cultural history), and comparative (by race and ethnicity as well as region) view of America's struggles for racial equality from roughly World War II until the present. Also listed as History C139C.

 

 

Comparative Literature 266

Nationalism, Colonialism and Culture

Tu 2-5P

4 units

RAM

H

 

Prerequisites: Preparation in two foreign languages.

Comparative investigation of a topic in ideology, politics, and identity and its relation to the formation of national, colonial, and/or post-colonial literatures and cultures.

 

 

History 178

History of Holocaust

TuTh 930-11am

4 units

EFRON, J M

H/S

 

This course will survey the historical events and intellectual developments leading up to and surrounding the destruction of European Jewry during World War II. We will examine the Shoah (the Hebrew word for the Holocaust) against the backdrop of modern Jewish and modern German history. The course is divided into two main parts: (1) the historical background up to 1939; and (2) the destruction of European Jewry, 1939-1945.

 

 

Legal Studies 168

Sex, Reproduction and the Law

MW 4-530pm

4 units

HOLLINGER

H/S

 

This course examines recent American legal and social history with respect to reproductive and sexual behavior. We will consider two theoretical aspects of the problem: first, theories of how law regulates social behavior and second, more general theories about how reproduction is socially regulated. Armed with these theoretical perspectives, the course will then examine closely a number of legal/social conflicts, including sterilization, abortion and contraception.

 

Legal Studies 174

 

 

Comparative Constitutional Law: The Case of Israel

TuTh 330-5P

4 units

LEHAVI, A

H/S

 

This course will provide an introduction to constitutional law using Israel as a case study. Topics include: Constitutionalism and judicial review, state neutrality and self-determination, minority rights, state and religion, Human Rights Law, the concept of "defensive democracy" and ban of non-democratic political parties, legal aspects of the fight on terror, freedom of expression, equality and anti-discrimination, social rights, and constitutional limitations on privatization.

 

 

Legal Studies 189

Feminist Jurisprudence

TuTh 930-11A

4 units

ABRAMS, K R

H/S

 

This course will explore the ways in which feminist theory has shaped conceptions of the law, as well as examine a range of feminist legal theories, including equality, difference, dominance, intersectional, poststructural, postcolonial theories. It will ask how these theories have shaped legal interventions in areas including workplace/educational access, sexualized coercion, work/family conflict, "cultural" defenses, and globalized sweatshop labor.

 

 

Peace and Conflict 127

Human Rights and Global Politics

TuTh 1230-2pm

4 units

SHACKFORD-BRADLEY

S

 

After World War II, we witnessed a "revolution" in human rights theory, practice, and institution building. The implications of viewing individuals as equal and endowed with certain rights is potentially far reaching as in the declaration that individuals hold many of those rights irrespective of the views of their government. Yet, we also live in a world of sovereign states with sovereign state's rights. We see every day a clash between the rights of the individual and lack of duty to fulfill those rights when an individual's home state is unwilling or unable to do so. After introducing the idea of human rights, its historic development and various international human rights mechanisms, this course will ask what post-World War II conceptions of human rights mean for a number of specific issues including humanitarian intervention, international criminal justice, U.S. foreign policy, immigration, and economic rights. Looking in-depth at these five areas, we will ask how ideas about human rights, laws about human rights, and institutions to protect human rights have on how states and other global actors act, and how individuals have fared.

 

 

Peace and Conflict 128AC

Human Rights and American Cultures

TuTh 230-5pm

4 units

SHACKFORD-BRADLEY

H/S

 

The course analyzes the theory and practice of human rights for three groupings in the United States and examines questions of race and ethnicity as they are embedded in various international human rights instruments. The course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of developing systems, laws, and norms for the promotion and protection of human rights while considering each group's underlying political, literary, and cultural traditions.

 

 

Political Science 124C

Ethics and Justice in International Affairs

TuTh 11am-1230pm

4 units

GUROWITZ, A

H/S

 

Should nations intervene in other countries to prevent human rights abuses or famine? On what principles should immigration be based? Should wealthy states aid poorer states, and if so, how much? Who should pay for global environmental damage? Answers to these moral questions depend to a great degree on who we believe we have an obligation to: Ourselves? Nationals of our country? Residents of our country? Everyone in the world equally? We will examine different traditions of moral thought including skeptics, communitarians, cosmopolitans, and use these traditions as tools to make reasoned judgments about difficult moral problems in world politics.

 

 

Political Science 191.9

Bringing Human Rights Home

4 units

SILVERBERG, H

S

 

Course Description TBA

 

 

Political Science 191.10

Human Rights, Global Politics and International Law

4 units

SILVERBERG, H

S

 

Course Description TBA

 

 

Rhetoric 139 

Rhetoric of Visual Witnessing 

MW 4-530pm

4 units

MASCUCH, M J

H

 

Studies of the theory and practice of the rhetoric of visual evidence relating to catastrophe. Themes may include witnessing, testimony, the photographic record, news media, and archival knowledge around such subjects as genocide and crimes against humanity, war and other forms of political violence, the AIDS epidemic, natural disaster.

 

 

Tibetan 115

Contemporary Tibet

TuTh 930-11am

4 units

RONIS

H

 

This course seeks to develop a critical understanding of contemporary Tibet, characterized as it is by modernity, invasion, Maoism, liberalization, exile, and diaspora. It explores the cultural dynamism of the Tibetans over the last 100 years as expressed in literature, film, music, modern art, and political protest. The core topics include intra-Tibetan arguments regarding the preservation and "modernization" of traditional cultural forms, the development of new aesthetic creations and values, the constraints and opportunities on cultural life under colonialism and in the diaspora, and the religious nationalism of the recent political protests.